QueSPER Research Projects

Planets in the Solar System

Uranus

Uranus

QueSPER Research Plan and Note-taking Worksheets

Uranus and some of its moons

Uranus and its rings

 Uranus Printout

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How far is Uranus from the Sun?
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Uranus is the seventh closest planet to the Sun.

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Uranus is about 1.8 billion miles or 2.8 billion kilometers from the Sun.

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Uranus is 19.218 AU* from the Sun.

 

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How big is Uranus? (What is its diameter?)
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Uranus is the third largest planet in the solar system. Jupiter and Saturn are larger.

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Uranus is about four times larger than Earth.

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Uranus's diameter is 31,764 miles at the equator.

 

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What does Uranus look like?
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Uranus has an atmosphere of hydrogen, helium and methane.

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Uranus has a temperature of -353 F.

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Uranus has 27 moons. Twenty-one of them have names; 6 do not.

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Uranus has a greenish-blue color.

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Uranus was probably knocked sideways by a collision with and Earth-size object. Now Uranus rolls around the sun like a ball, while the other planets spin around the sun like tops.

 
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Why is this planet named Uranus?
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Uranus is named for an ancient Greek sky god.

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Uranus was the first planet to be discovered by telescope. It was discovered by William Herschel on March 13, 1781.

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Its name, Uranus, was chosen to conform with the references to Greek and Roman mythology of the other planets. The name did not come into common use until 1850. Before that is was called various names including Herschel, and The Georgian Planet.

 

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Can I see Uranus in the night sky?
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Yes, but you must have very sharp eyes. Most people use a telescope to see Uranus. To see if it is visible now, check the Sky Maps.

*One AU is the distance from the center of the Earth to the center of the Sun.

Information on this page was taken from the following websites:

The-Solar-System.Net

Links to Other Sites

bulletExplore a Planet - Uranus
bullet Astronomy for Kids

Books and References

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Time for Kids Almanac 2003 with Information Please. NY: Time for Kids Books, 2002. RL 4.5 Dewey 031.02
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Farndon, John. The Giant Book of Space. Brookfield,CT: Copper Beech Bks, 2000. RL 4.5 Dewey 523.4

"The Solar System 12/2006: 8 Planets; The New Cosmic Order." Map Insert. National Geographic Magazine.  Dec., 2006.

Other Links to Sites

The Nine Planets-Uranus

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